Reading 2.0

In the middle of the year I was fortunate enough to attend the NECC 2008 Conference in San Antonio, and one of the sessions which really inspired me was called “Feed, Tag, Research: Remixing for School Library 2.5″. A group of 7 innovative TLs from America and Australia shared their passion to incorporate best practice Web 2.0 technologies into their libraries to enrich and empower students of today and tomorrow.

Anita Beaman – librarian at University High School, Illinois State University – was one of those presenters, and her passion is to meld books, reading and Web 2.0 – using 2.0 technology to promote reading for pleasure. Together with Amy Oberts, TL from Oakland Elementary School, Bloomington, Anita has developed a wiki called ‘Reading 2.0’ aimed at bringing together all kinds of internet sites which promote interaction with books and reading. Check it out at http://readingtech.wikispaces.com/

These ladies say: “Harnessing technology to excite and empower your students’ literary development is our mission for Reading 2.0!

To encourage the digital native generation to read, we may have to redefine what we mean by reading. According to a recent article in American Libraries, teens are reading all the time–they just aren’t always reading in the “traditional ways.”So why not use what they DO read to encourage them to read more books? Use online forums like MySpace, YouTube, author blogs, and online book groups to help get your students excited about reading. Compile a brief list of links with additional info about an author or topic and print them on an address label. Stick the label in the books in a highly visible place–on the last page, or opposite the first page. Encourage your students to explore reading in their own territory.”

Below are some examples of the types of information Anita puts into the novels in her library:

Meg Cabot

Want more of Meg?  Here’s where to look!

Website: http://www.megcabot.com/

Meg’s Diary: http://www.megcabot.com/diary/

Myspace: http://www.myspace.com/meg_cabot

Myspace Groups: http://groups.myspace.com/megcabotbookfans or http://groups.myspace.com/authermegc

Teen Lit (MySpace): http://groups.myspace.com/teenlit

Readergirlz: http://www.readergirlz.com/ or  http://www.myspace.com/readergirlz

Not Your Mother’s Book Club: http://www.myspace.com/notyourmothers

Sarah Dessen

Hey!  If you’re a Sarah Dessen fan, check out these sites online:

Website: http://www.sarahdessen.com/

Myspace: http://www.myspace.com/sarahdessen

Blog: http://writergrl.livejournal.com/

Sarahland: A Live Journal Community for Sarah Dessen Fans:

http://community.livejournal.com/sarah_land/

Teen Lit (MySpace): http://groups.myspace.com/teenlit

Readergirlz: http://www.readergirlz.com/ or  http://www.myspace.com/readergirlz

Not Your Mother’s Book Club: http://www.myspace.com/notyourmothers

Scott Westerfeld

Want more Westerfeld?  Check out the web:

Webpage: http://www.scottwesterfeld.com/

Westerblog: http://www.scottwesterfeld.com/blog/

Myspace: http://www.myspace.com/westerfeld

Westerfeld Myspace Group: http://groups.myspace.com/scottwesterfeld

Teen Lit (MySpace): http://groups.myspace.com/teenlit

Not Your Mother’s Book Club: http://www.myspace.com/notyourmothers

Lookybook

Lookybook is a great site where you can actually look at picture books before you buy them. At first I thought it was a bit silly to allow people to see the whole book first, but the more I’ve looked, the more I’ve found that I’d like to buy!  It’s just like standing in a bookstore and browsing the books – except you do it from your own computer at your leisure.

 

“The world’s longest bookshelf. Libraries and bookstores have limited space, so the only book covers you see are generally best sellers. But what about all of those other books—new books, obscure books, undiscovered gems that are stuck sideways on the shelf, or worse, in a warehouse somewhere. Since we have infinite shelf space, every book on Lookybook is displayed cover out and searchable by a number of different criteria.”

To find books, you can search by keyword, author, illustrator, subject or genre, or you can click on the “Book Tumbler” to get a random selection of books. Each book has listed the size, number of pages, age level, publishing details and a review. If you like the book, you then have the option to purchase it online through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or Book Sense.

You also have the option to create a free account, which then enables you to create your own bookshelf of favourite titles, add comments, email the link to a friend, or you can save the link to your favourites in Facebook, Del.icio.us, StumbleUpon or Digg.

“Your Bookshelf. We value the book reviews of librarians and industry experts and we especially value the opinions of moms and dads. Because we are a site for looking at and discovering new books, we want to know what you think and like. Not only can you share your comments about a particular book, you can share all your favorite books by creating and posting your Bookshelf. Fellow Lookybookers can look at your favorites and show you theirs—creating a virtual show-and-tell about today’s best picture books. (register to get a Bookshelf)”

The downside is that there are not many Australian authors or illustrators on the site; the upside is that you might just discover some really nice picture books that you’ve never heard of before!

This is an example of a picture book from Lookybook:

“When Pigasso met Mootisse” by Nina Laden